Miki Suzuki

Discover Coffee

Miki Suzuki

鈴木樹

PROFILE

Barista Message Miki Suzuki

Innovation Department / Barista

From Kanagawa Prefecture

イノベーション部/バリスタ

神奈川県出身

Competition results

  • 2009

    Japan Latte Art Championship: 6th Place

  • 2009

    Japan Barista Championship: 9th Place

  • 2010

    Japan Latte Art Championship: 6th Place

  • 2010

    Japan Barista Championship: Champion

  • 2011

    World Barista Championship: 5th Place

  • 2011

    Japan Barista Championship: Champion

  • 2012

    World Barista Championship: 4th Place

  • 2013

    Japan Barista Championship: 2nd Place

  • 2014

    Japan Barista Championship 2014: 3rd place

  • 2015

    Japan Barista Championship: 4th Place

  • 2016

    Japan Barista Championship: Champion

  • 2017

    World Barista championship: 2nd Place

主な競技会成績

  • 2009年

    ジャパン ラテアート チャンピオンシップ 第6位

  • 2009年

    ジャパン バリスタ チャンピオンシップ 第9位

  • 2010年

    ジャパン ラテアート チャンピオンシップ 第6位

  • 2010年

    ジャパン バリスタ チャンピオンシップ 優勝

  • 2011年

    ワールド バリスタ チャンピオンシップ 第5位

  • 2011年

    ジャパン バリスタ チャンピオンシップ 優勝

  • 2012年

    ワールド バリスタ チャンピオンシップ 第4位

  • 2013年

    ジャパン バリスタ チャンピオンシップ 準優勝

  • 2014年

    ジャパン バリスタ チャンピオンシップ 第3位

  • 2015年

    ジャパン バリスタ チャンピオンシップ 第4位

  • 2016年

    ジャパン バリスタ チャンピオンシップ 優勝

  • 2017年

    ワールド バリスタ チャンピオンシップ 準優勝

I wanted to be a pastry chef

My childhood dream was to be a pastry chef. My mom would bake cookies, brownies and other baked treats every weekend. Helping her in the kitchen was my older sister's and my favorite form of play. After that I gradually learned to make sweets by myself. I'd save up my allowance and buy books and ingredients. I spent my sensitive teenage years absorbed in pursuing my hobby. I decided I wanted to get a job that made people happy and also improve my baking skills, so after graduating from high school I enrolled in a school for pastry chefs. Then I got a job at a pastry shop. I was very excited—I'd realized my childhood dream and was looking forward to a happy and fulfilling career. But it turned out that the work was extremely demanding, in terms of both stamina and ability. I worked from morning to night with few days off, and I came to envy friends who sang the praises of university life. What's more, very few of the techniques that I'd learned in school could be applied in my job, so I was spending most of my time learning and practicing. I couldn't seem to fully master the skills that my boss and older co-workers expected me to, and I was frustrated and unhappy with myself. I was also taking a serious look at my life and wondering if I'd be able to live this way in ten years. In the same period a family member became ill, so I decided to let go of my childhood dream in order to help with their care. I took some time to rest and think, and I decided that when I found an occupation that I thought I could love, I'd commit myself to it and make it my life's work. In the period when I was helping with the care of my family member, I also went to Okinawa three times and got my scuba diving license—I had a lot of fun, which I hadn't been able to do when I was working at the pastry shop.

Discovering the occupation "barista"

After leaving the pastry shop and spending three months doing things I wanted to do and enjoying myself, I was thinking anxiously that I might become a social misfit if I didn't work, so I started looking for a job. That was when I discovered the occupation called barista. At the time, barista was a job that few people even knew about—the word itself was hardly used. But when I was working at the pastry shop, I'd buy or borrow specialized magazines and read them for study purposes, and several times I came across special features about coffee. I started taking an interest in coffee and went to some coffee shops. Actually, I'd never liked coffee. My parents liked it and made it every morning, but I'd never taken a liking to the smell or the taste. While I was going to various coffee shops, I discovered the flavor of coffee. It also occurred to me that it might be convenient to work at a coffee shop since they open early in the morning, so I applied for a part-time job. That was my entree into the world of coffee. Since I had never been a coffee drinker, I really didn't know anything. Everything I saw and learned in the job was new, and every day was filled with discoveries and new knowledge. I immediately became absorbed in it. I've always been like that—when I get interested in something I become engrossed in it immediately and put all my time and energy into it. I recall that I studied frantically because I wanted so much to become a real barista and make good coffee for customers. I began my career as a barista at Zoka Coffee, a coffee shop that started in Seattle. At Zoka I made a lot of irreplaceable encounters that brought me to a turning point in my life. There were the more experienced baristas who talked passionately about coffee, sometimes to the point of shedding tears of emotion, and friends who spoke candidly, in a spirit of friendly competition, about wanting to improve their coffee making skill. The days were filled with laughter and tears. Looking back now, it was a really enjoyable and fulfilling time in my life. And that was when something amazing happened that expanded the possibilities of coffee for me. It was at a company workshop about the seasonal drinks we were going to make for that time of year. The instructor was Yoshiharu Sakamoto, who then worked for Zoka Coffee. At the time, flavors like caramel pudding latte and tiramisu latte were the mainstream trend in coffee drinks. Nevertheless, the drinks that Mr. Sakamoto presented to us were "cappuccino" and "caffe latte." At a time when most of the recommended seasonal drinks were mixtures with sweet flavors, he declared, "Our strength is our coffee's quality. That's why we're going to show people once again what's so great about high-quality cappuccino and caffe latte." I thought, how radical and cool—he's amazing. I felt lucky to be working at the company where he worked. I was filled with admiration.

パティシエになりたかった

子供の頃の夢は、パティシエでした。我が家では、毎週末、母親がクッキーやブラウニーなどの手作りのお菓子を作ってくれました。母のお菓子作りを手伝うことが姉と私の一番楽しい遊びでした。その後、徐々に一人で作れるようになり、お小遣いを貯めては本や食材を買い、趣味を深めながら多感な時期を過ごしました。人を幸せにできる仕事につきたい、ケーキをもっと上手に作りたいという思いから、高校卒業後はパティシエの専門学校に通い、そしてケーキ屋さんに就職をしました。子供の頃からの夢が叶い、とても幸せな現実が待っているとワクワクしていましたが、実際には体力的にも能力的にも非常に過酷な仕事でした。朝から晩まで働き、休日もあまりなく、周囲の友人が大学生活を謳歌しているのが羨ましくなりました。技術も学校で学んだことがほとんど通じず、勉強と練習漬けの日々でした。上司・先輩たちが求めている能力に辿りつけない自分が歯がゆく悔しくありました。そして同時に、将来、十年後もこの生活ができるだろうかと、自分の人生に向き合い、そして同じタイミングで、家族が病に倒れ看病のために夢を諦めることにしました。ゆっくり休んで、次に自分が好きだと思える仕事が見つけられたら、それを人生の仕事にできるよう真剣に取り組もうと決心をしました。そして、家族の看病をしながら、沖縄に三回行き、ダイビングの免許をとったりと、今まで仕事があってやれなかったことを遊び尽くしました。

バリスタという仕事との出会い

退職後、3ヶ月やりたいことをやり尽くして、遊び尽くしたころ、そろそろ働かねば完全に社会不適合者になってしまうとの焦りから、仕事を探し始めました。そこで、バリスタという仕事に出会いました。当時バリスタという職業は、言葉もほとんど使われておらず、知る人のみ知るという職業でした。しかし、ケーキの仕事をしている中で、勉強のために専門誌などを買ったり借りたりして読んでいたのですが、その中で何度かコーヒーの特集を目にする機会があり、コーヒーに対して興味を持ち、いくつかコーヒーショップに通いました。実は、私はこの頃までコーヒーが飲めませんでした。両親はコーヒーが好きで、毎朝コーヒーを淹れていましたが、私は香りや味がどうしても好きになれずにいました。それが、コーヒーショップを回るうちにコーヒーの味わいに目覚め、またコーヒーショップならば朝が早いので働きやすいのではないかと考えアルバイトの職に応募し、コーヒーの扉をひらきました。今までコーヒーを飲んで来なかった分、私にとっては知らないことばかりで、見るもの全て、知るもの全てが新しく、毎日が発見と学びの連続で、すぐに夢中になってしました。昔から、自分が興味を持つものを見つけるとすぐに夢中になってしまい、寝食を忘れて没頭してしまうことがあります。早く一人前のバリスタになりたくて、早くお客様にコーヒーを提供できるようになりたくて必死に勉強をしたのを覚えています。私が、バリスタの仕事を始めたのは、ZOKAコーヒーというシアトルから始まったコーヒーショップでした。ここで、人生の転機になる非常にかけがえのない出会いがたくさんありました。コーヒーのことに熱く、時には感極まって涙しながら語ってくれるバリスタの先輩たちや、もっと上手にコーヒーを淹れられるようになりたいと切磋琢磨する気の置けない友人たち。毎日泣き笑いを繰り返して、今振り返っても本当に楽しく充実した時間でした。そんな中で、当時の自分にとってコーヒーの可能性を広げる衝撃的な出来事がありました。それは、社内で開催された今期のシーズナルドリンクについてのワークショップでの出来事でした。講師は、当時ZOKAコーヒーに所属していた阪本義治さんが担当されていました。そこで、世の中はキャラメルプディングラテやティラミスラテなどが主流となっていた中、発表されたのは、なんと「カプチーノ」と「カフェラテ」でした。季節の推奨ドリンクといえば、甘さの入ったアレンジドリンクが主流だったあの時代に、「我々の強みはコーヒーの品質だ、だから、高品質のカプチーノとカフェラテの魅力を再度打ち出していくのだ」という宣誓は、非常にロックで格好良く、凄い方だなと、この人と一緒の会社で働けて幸運だったなと思い、尊敬の念を抱きました。

The phone call that cleared the haze

I was very lucky. I'd gotten a job at Zoka and learned about coffee and about serving customers, I had wonderful co-workers, and I'd been trained so that I was able to make and serve coffee for people as a barista. But it wasn't all smooth sailing. Unfortunately, the shop where I'd started working closed, and my teacher, Mr. Sakamoto, had left the company. I was feeling unsatisfied; something was lacking. I was also starting to have a sense of identity as a barista, and I wanted a chance to make coffee in a way that was more my own, to work with products with more diverse qualities and to make coffee in more diverse settings. I decided to leave the company. Through a connection, I started working at a cafe in Kamakura. There I made coffee with beans from a famous roaster in Japan, and also had the opportunity to do other types of work including creating menus. It was a great experience. The drawback was that it wasn't a specialty coffee shop and there weren't many orders for coffee. The working environment was very good, but I felt an indescribable anxiety: I wasn't sure if I was really growing as a barista. Around that time I received a fateful phone call that cleared the haze. Mr. Sakamoto, my former barista mentor at Zoka, invited me to join Maruyama Coffee. He asked me just what I'd been asking myself: "What do you want your future to be like?" Seeking his advice, I stammered out, "I want to keep working in the coffee business for a long time, but I don't know how to go about it." In reply, he told me they were going to open a new store in Komoro (a city in Nagano prefecture) and invited me to go there. I'd never even heard of Komoro before. I told Mr. Sakamoto I couldn't make the decision completely on my own as it would involve moving to a different prefecture, and I asked him to give me a little time. The phone call ended there. But the instant I hung up, my mind was made up. I told my parents and they agreed—probably because they knew it would be pointless to object. So the next day I was on my mobile phone, telling Mr. Sakamoto I'd like to work there. We quickly arranged an interview. When I got off the train at Sakudaira Station, Mr. Sakamoto came to meet me together with Mr. Maruyama, the president of Maruyama Coffee. Mr. Maruyama drove us to the Komoro store, which was still under construction, and gave us a tour of the site. The president of Maruyama Coffee, a famous figure in the coffee world, was extremely nice despite the fact that we were meeting for the first time. I was nervous and excited, wondering when the interview was going to start, but before I knew it the day was over and I was hired.

The impact of Maruyama Coffee

I'd taken the plunge into the barista life at Maruyama Coffee, and it turned out to be completely different from what I'd imagined. At the shops where I'd worked before, the instructions were set down in detail in a manual: pull the lever three times when you grind the coffee, use the button of the preset extraction program, make an adjustment so that the coffee comes out in a certain number of seconds, and so on. At Maruyama Coffee, there was no manual-like manual at the time; the philosophy was that if everyone shared the same goal, the individual approach could be left up to each barista. Something I remember well is that my trainer, Watanabe-san, taught me how to fold the dustcloths. I'd always thought it didn't really matter how I folded them, but Watanabe-san explained why it was important to fold them in a neat and functional way. As a result, I realized that everything had a reason—that something as simple as folding dustcloths changes the way you work and, ultimately, your approach to coffee. I wondered about the lack of a manual, so I asked Mr. Sakamoto. He told me that espresso and barista techniques were always evolving; therefore, instead of making a manual, Maruyama Coffee based its guidelines on the rules and regulations of the Japan Barista Championship. The reason, he explained, was that they reflected a worldwide standard and were updated each year; thus, they were the ideal manual for Maruyama Coffee, which was continually improving its raw ingredients and extraction methods. As someone who was accustomed to using manuals, I found this really fresh and exciting, and realized once again how little I knew about coffee and what an amazing place I'd ended up in. This gave me a sense of urgency—a feeling that I really needed to apply myself in order to reach that level.

I have to make a place for myself!

I'd always thought it would be fun to be able to make coffee every day, so everything about life at Maruyama Coffee was really exciting. At the time, the only people who used the title "barista" were distinguished national competition finalists, including baristas Watanabe, Miyagawa, Nakahara, and Sekiguchi. I thought that in order to survive as a barista at Maruyama Coffee, I would have to become at least a finalist and make a place for myself in the company, so I felt a great sense of anxiety. I'd never been good at speaking in front of people, and I'd thought of competitions as a world apart. But when I saw the way Mr. Sakamoto and my more experienced colleagues looked seriously at each coffee bean and worked so hard, when I saw how they shone as they went about their work, I finally decided to take on the challenge of a competition myself. The actual competition was an even tougher world than I'd imagined. At the time, Maruyama Coffee had not yet won a competition, so President Maruyama and Mr. Sakamoto, in addition to the baristas, were putting in a tremendous amount of time and energy in order to win. It was really a do-or-die kind of effort. Seeing them under this fierce pressure, laughing and crying and working hard as a team to move even one step forward, I was really dazzled; I wanted to be a barista like them. In an article at the time, President Maruyama described baristas using the phrase "baristas who put their heart into it." Witnessing that do-or-die spirit just after reading the article, I understood that Mr. Maruyama was that serious because he believed in baristas' potential more strongly than anyone. That's why I felt in my heart that I wanted to reach a point where I would be recognized as a full-fledged barista.

モヤモヤを晴らした一本の電話

私はとてもラッキーでした。ZOKAコーヒーで働け、コーヒーや接客を学び、仲間にも恵まれ、そしてバリスタとしてコーヒーを提供できるようになるまで育てていただきました。しかし、全てが順風満帆とは行かず、働き始めたお店は残念ながら閉店してしまい、そして恩師である阪本さんも会社を去ってしまい物足りない日々を過ごしていました。そしてバリスタとしての自我も芽生え始め、もっと自由にコーヒーを淹れてみたい、もっと異なる品質のものを取り扱ってみたい、もっと異なる環境でコーヒーを淹れてみたいと思い、会社を離れることにしました。その後ご縁あって鎌倉のカフェで働き始めました。日本の著名な焙煎店の豆を使い、コーヒーを淹れるだけでなくメニューを開発するなど、非常に良い経験をさせていただきました。しかしコーヒーの専門店ではないため注文自体が少なく、とても良い環境ではあったのですが、バリスタとして本当に成長できているのだろうかと言葉にできない不安を抱えていました。そんなモヤモヤとしていた時に、一本の運命的な電話がありました。ZOKA時代のバリスタの恩師である阪本さんからの丸山珈琲へのリクルートのお誘いでした。将来どうなりたいのか?と今まさに迷っていることを質問され、しどろもどろになりながらコーヒーの仕事を今後も長く続けていきたいがどうしていいのか迷っているという相談から、小諸に新しいお店を作るから来ないかと誘っていただきました。小諸という地名も初めて聞く場所で、県外への引越しを伴うため自分の一存では決められないので、少し時間が欲しいとお返事し電話を切りました。しかし、電話を切った瞬間にはもう思いは決まっていました。両親に報告し、言っても聞かないだろうと思われたのか快諾してもらい、翌日には、働かせてくださいと伝えるために携帯を手にとっていました。早々に面接を取り付け、佐久平の駅に降り立ったら、丸山社長と阪本さんが迎えにきてくださり、丸山社長の運転のもと工事中の小諸店を見学させてもらいました。珈琲業界でも有名な丸山社長が初対面にも関わらずあまりにも親切で、またいつ面接が始まるのだろうかということを、ドキドキヒヤヒヤしながらあっという間に1日が終わり、無事に採用をしていただけました。

丸山珈琲というインパクト

飛び込んでみた丸山珈琲でのバリスタライフは想像していたものと全く異なりました。今までのお店は、コーヒーの粉を挽くときはレバーを3回引きなさい、抽出プログラムがセットされたボタンを使用し、何秒程度に落ちるように調整しましょうという風に細かくマニュアル化がされていました。当時、丸山珈琲には、マニュアルらしいマニュアルはなく、ゴールが一緒であればアプローチはバリスタ個人に任せるというスタンスをとっていました。そして、未だに印象に残っていることは、当時、私の教育を担当してくださった渡辺さんがダスターのたたみ方について教えてくれたことです。ダスターなんてどうたたんでも良いと思っていた私にとって、なぜ綺麗に機能的にたたむことが重要なのかを教えていただき、全ての物事に意味があるということ、そしてダスターのたたみ方ひとつで作業も最終的なコーヒーへのアプローチも変わってくるということに気づかされました。マニュアルがないことを疑問に思い阪本さんに伺ったところ、エスプレッソやバリスタの技術は常に進化をしている。そのためマニュアルを作るのではなく、指針をジャパン・バリスタ・チャンピオンシップのルールアンドレギュレーションに則っている、何故なら世界的な基準であり、そして毎年アップデートされているから、素材も抽出も進化し続けている丸山珈琲にとってルールアンドレギュレーションこそが最適なマニュアルだと説明いただきました。マニュアルに慣れていた私にとってはとても新鮮で刺激的でそして改めて自分がコーヒーのことを知らない、すごい場所にきてしまったという思いから、このレベルに追いつくためにもっと精進しなければと危機感を募らせました。

自分の居場所をつくらなければ!

毎日コーヒーを淹れられたら楽しいのではないかと思っていた私にとって、一事が万事丸山珈琲の生活は非常に刺激的でした。当時、社内でバリスタと名乗っていたのは、渡辺バリスタ、宮川バリスタ、中原バリスタ、関口バリスタと錚々たる国内大会のファイナリストだけでした。丸山珈琲でバリスタとして生きていくためには、最低でもファイナリストにならねばならない、この会社で自分の居場所を作らなければいけないと思い大変危機感を募らせていました。これまで、人前で話すことも得意ではなく、大会なんて自分とは別世界のものと考えていましたが、阪本さんや先輩たちの一つの豆に向き合う姿や、努力する姿、キラキラとした後ろ姿をみて自分も大会に挑戦する決心をすることができました。実際の大会は自分が想像する以上に厳しい世界でした。当時無冠の丸山珈琲としては優勝を奪取するためにバリスタたちだけでなく丸山社長、阪本さんが多くの時間と熱量を注ぐまさに人生がかかっているような真剣勝負の世界でした。凄まじいプレッシャーのもと、泣き笑い、チームとして一歩でも前にと進む姿は、とても眩しくいつかあんなバリスタになりたいと憧れを抱きました。当時何かの記事に「ハートを注ぐバリスタ」と丸山社長がバリスタのことを表現していました。その記事を読んだ直後に、この真剣勝負の世界を見て、丸山社長が他の誰よりもバリスタの可能性を信じてくださっているからこそこんなにも真剣なのかと理解し、だからこそ自分もバリスタとして認めてもらえるようになりたいと心の底から思いました。

The example and encouraging words of senior baristas

The first time I entered a barista championship, I came in ninth. I didn't even reach my minimum goal of becoming a finalist. What's more, in engaging in the competition I became acutely aware that there was a huge gap between the finalists and me, even though we shared the title barista. The winner of the first barista championship in which I competed was my senior colleague, barista Nakahara. Even under tremendous pressure he was always positive and cheerful; and despite the fact that he was extremely busy with his own work, he took the time to help me, since it was my first competition. I really can't express my admiration and gratitude enough. It was Nakahara-san who taught me about the fun of a competition and the fun of engaging with a cup of coffee. I was also aware that it wasn't because of my ability that I'd attained ninth place—that I'd depended on the support of my team. I was extremely disappointed by my own weakness. I was determined that one day I'd be able to make more delicious espresso than anyone, and I decided to compete again. I'd aspired to become an independent barista rather than depend on my team, but in fact I'd put everyone to a lot of trouble and they'd spent a lot time helping me. Thinking I wouldn't have another chance to compete if my ranking fell, I entered the Japan Barista Championship with the idea that it was my final challenge; and thanks to Nakahara-san and my coach, Mr. Sakamoto, I received recognition that exceeded my actual ability and captured a victory. I was the only barista from Maruyama Coffee who advanced to the final and I thought I might be defeated by my own anxiety and tension; but Nakahara-san said, "Your espresso has the best flavor, so just relax and give your best performance." With that encouragement I was in fact able to relax and make my best effort, and I had such a happy time that I almost felt disappointed when my 15 minutes were over. I'd experienced the joy you feel when people understand what you want to do and express.

I want to stand on the stage of the World Championship again

I was often asked, "Why do you keep at it?" People in a variety of positions said to me, "You've been a finalist in the World Championship twice, and there's nothing but risk in competing in the Japan Championship now, since you'll be told that your standing has fallen if you finish in anything other than first place—so why do you keep competing?" For me, the reason is simple: I want to compete in the final round of the World Barista Championship again. It's very hard to put into words, but competing in the World Championship is much, much more enjoyable than competing in the Japan Championship. I feel as though the World Championship is a place where I can experience the joy of preparing and serving coffee, and connecting with people through coffee, in a really concentrated and vivid way. I can experience the barista's instinctive joy to the maximum extent. In 2014, Barista Izaki became World Champion, and I was truly saved. To me, he's a benefactor and a hero. The World Championship is Maruyama Coffee's long-cherished hope and the dream of Asian baristas. With Mr. Izaki's win, I was liberated from the pressure of aiming for the title of World Champion, and I felt a sense of relief and satisfaction. Nevertheless, with the strong encouragement and support of my coach Mr. Sakamoto, Izaki-san, Nakahara-san and President Maruyama, I decided to compete in the World Championship again and try to win. Things didn't go well after that, however: my ranking in the Japan Championship gradually fell—I finished second, then third, then fourth. It was a very tough time. When I think about it now, I realize I was hampered by my past experiences of success and I wasn't taking real risks or making my best effort in the truest sense. The reason I couldn't give up even then was that I wanted to compete in the final round of the World Barista Championship again. That was it, pure and simple.

The best team and my best performance

The happiest time in my life as a barista happened in November 2017. It was in the final round of the World Barista Championship in Seoul, when I made my best-ever showing and earned second place in the competition. When people hear I came in second, they might not know what to say. But to me, the result was an acknowledgement of the fact that I'd succeeded in giving the best performance of my life and that I gave it everything I had. It had been about 14 months since I won the Japan Championship in 2016, and about five years since I competed in the World Championship in Vienna. I'd been looking forward to that day for a very long time. It had finally become a reality, and nothing could have made me happier. A barista competition is 70 percent preparation. It hinges on how detailed and complex a program you can create, and whether you can produce coffee with flavor that meets international standards. And that's a team effort. Building a good team is essential. I asked Izaki-san to be my coach, not only because he was World Champion and had a wealth of coffee knowledge and experience, but because I have the greatest trust and respect for him as a person and as a barista. And, with the support of many people from inside and outside Maruyama Coffee behind "Team Miki"—in particular President Maruyama, barista Nakahara, head roaster Miyagawa and Yamashiro-san, who have always believed in my potential as a barista even more than I have—as well as others too numerous to name—I had the best possible team with me for the competition

先輩バリスタの背中とことば

そして、初めて出場したバリスタ・チャンピオンシップの結果は9位でした。最低でもファイナリストにならなければと思っていた私の目標は達成されず、そして大会に向き合う中で改めて、バリスタという肩書きは同じでも彼らと自分の差は非常に大きいということを痛感しました。初めて挑戦をしたバリスタ・チャンピオンシップの勝者は先輩である中原バリスタでした。大きなプレッシャーを背負いながらも、いつも前向きで、自分のことだけでも大変にもかかわらず、初出場の私の世話までしてくれ、本当に頭が上がりません。大会の楽しさ、一つのコーヒーに向き合う楽しさを教えてくれたのは中原バリスタでした。そして、今回の9位という順位は実力でもなんでもなくチームの力におんぶに抱っこになっていた不甲斐ない自分に気づき、大変悔しく感じました。誰よりも美味しいエスプレッソを淹れられるようになりたいと心の底から思い、もう一度挑戦することを決めました。チームにおんぶに抱っこではない、自立したバリスタを目指そうと臨みましたが、やはり皆さんに迷惑をかけてばかりで、たくさんの時間を私のために費やしてもらいました。これで順位を落としたら、もう次は出させてもらうことはできないと思い、最後の挑戦と思い取り組んだJBCでは中原バリスタ、阪本コーチのお陰で自分の実力以上の評価をいただき優勝を勝ち取ることができました。丸山珈琲からは自分だけが決勝に進み、不安と緊張で押しつぶされそうでしたが、中原バリスタに「鈴木さんのエスプレッソが一番美味しいからのびのびやれば良いよ」と後押ししてもらい、のびのびとやって15分終わってしまうのが惜しいと思うような幸せな時間でした。自分がやりたいこと、伝えたいことをわかってもらえる喜びを知りました。

もう一度、世界大会の舞台に立ちたい

色々な方に「何故まだ挑戦するのですか」とよく聞かれました。世界のファイナリストに二回もなっているし、さらに日本の大会に出ても優勝以外の順位であれば順位が下がったと言われてしまう中でリスクしかないのに何故出場し続けるのですかと、色々な立場の方から質問を受けました。私の中では理由はシンプルです。世界大会のファイナルラウンドでもう一度競技をしたいからです。言葉にするのは大変難しいのですが、世界大会で競技をするということは日本大会で競技をすることの何十倍も楽しく、人にコーヒーを提供することの楽しさを、人とコーヒーを通じて繋がれる楽しさを、とても濃縮し感じることができる場だと思っています。バリスタとしての本能的な喜びを極限の中で感じられます。2014年、井崎バリスタが世界チャンピオンになり、心の底から救われました。私にとって彼は恩人でありヒーローです。丸山珈琲の悲願であり、アジア人の夢であるワールドバリスタチャンピオンシップでの優勝という称号を目指さなければいけないプレッシャーから解放されほっと満足した自分がいました。しかし、阪本コーチを始め、井崎さん、中原さん、そして丸山社長にも叱咤激励・後押ししていただき、もう一度世界大会に出て優勝を目指そうと決意をしました。しかし、そこからは2位、3位、4位と徐々に順位が落ち続けうまく行かず苦しい日々が続きました。今思うと、過去の成功体験を引きずり、本当の意味でのリスクをとっていなかったですし本当の意味での努力をしていませんでした。それでも諦めきれなかったのは、純粋にもう一度世界大会の決勝ラウンドで競技がしたい、ただそれだけでした。

最高のチームと、最高のパフォーマンス

2017年11月にバリスタ人生の中で一番幸せな時間が訪れました。WBCソウルでの決勝の舞台で、これまでの競技の中で一番の競技を行うことができ、そして2位という結果を得られた瞬間です。2位と聞くと、みなさん何と言っていいのか迷われるかもしれませんが、私にとっては過去最高のパフォーマンスができ、これ以上やりようがないというものが認められた結果なのでとても幸せでした。2016年に優勝してから約14ヶ月、2012年のウィーン大会から考えると約5年間。ずっとこの日を待ち続けてきました。それがようやく形になりこれ以上の幸せはありませんでした。バリスタの大会は、準備が7割です。どれだけ綿密なプログラムが組め、世界基準の味わいを作ることができるかにかかっています。そしてそれはチームとしての戦いです。チーム作りが重要です。コーチには井崎さんを招きました。私が彼にコーチを依頼したのは、彼が世界チャンピオンだから、コーヒーの知識と経験が豊富だからだけなく、人としてバリスタとして最も信頼し尊敬をしているからです。そして、いつも私以上にバリスタ鈴木樹の可能性を信じてくださっている丸山社長,中原バリスタ、宮川ヘッドロースター、山代さんを中心に、名前をあげきれませんがチームMIKIの裏には丸山珈琲社内・社外からたくさんの方の支援を受けて最高のチームで臨むことができました。

Message to customers

お客様へのメッセージ

What is "single origin," anyway? I often think about this in my work at the Omote-sando store. Literally, it means "from only one origin or starting point," but I feel as though single origin coffee often ends up being compared to blends and treated as "non-blended coffee." That is true, but it isn't that simple. I always hope to be able to change our customers' view that "single origin equals non-blended coffee." Naturally, blends have their own unique complexity and wonderful qualities reflecting the artisan's intentions. In addition, some of the coffees that we treat as single origin are actually single lots consisting of blends of two or more types of coffee cultivated on the same coffee farm, and some are blends of coffees gathered from two or more small farms. What I mean by single origin is the endeavor to deal with coffee in the smallest traceable units possible, by grower and by farm, as opposed to handling coffee in terms of large units like country and region of production, as has been the case until recently. With single origin, your thoughts as you enjoy the coffee may turn to the people who cultivated it, and where and how they grew it. And to me, "single origin" is also a history of discovery. Since Maruyama Coffee began purchasing coffee directly, "single origins" have been developing year by year. We have offered a wide range of coffees since I joined the company in 2008. Among them, the "single origins" have evolved in various ways. Under the name "Cangual village," we had long been using coffees from that village as ingredients in blends; but we came to know which growers' coffees were especially delicious, and thus Maria Arcadia's coffee, as well as the outstanding producer Solomon Benitez, have been discovered and we have been able to introduce the coffees under their names. In Costa Rica, there have been discoveries not only of differences among growers resulting from superior cultivation and production-processing techniques, but also of diverse flavors and infinite flavor possibilities created through the combination of farm/coffee type/production-processing. These discoveries have raised the "single origin" world to even greater heights. As long as we continue, the discoveries will continue as well; each year something new and exciting is discovered. That's why, at the Omote-sando single origin store, I hope to bring our excitement and amazement to our customers in the form of a coffee experience. Each day we work hard and aim to convey the excitement of coffee to our customers at all times, so that when you come to our store we can offer you, in one cup of coffee, an experience that is much more than simply drinking a cup of coffee.

そもそもシングルオリジンとは何だろうか。表参道シングルオリジンストアで働く中でよく考えています。直訳をすると単一の起源・原点という意味ですが、どうしてもブレンドと比較し「ブレンドされていないコーヒー」と扱われてしまうことが多いように感じます。事実ではありますが、そんな単純なものでもありません。私は、【シングルオリジン=ブレンドされていないコーヒー】というお客様の認識を変えたいといつも思っています。もちろんブレンドにはブレンドにしか作れない複雑さと職人の意図が反映された素晴らしい世界があります。そして私たちがシングルオリジンとして扱うコーヒーの中にも、実際には農園で複数種の品種が栽培されていてそれが混ぜられ一つのロットとなっていることもあれば、複数の小規模農園のものが集められ混ぜられていることもあります。私は、何を持ってシングルオリジンなのかということは、コーヒーが今まで生産国ごと・地方ごとというような大きな単位で扱われてきたことに対して、追跡できる最小の単位で、生産者ごと、農園ごとに扱おうという取り組みだと考えています。どんな方たちが、どこで、どんな風に作ったコーヒーなのかを思いを馳せながら楽しんでいただけるコーヒーです。そして私にとっては【シングルオリジン】は発見の歴史だと思っています。丸山珈琲が直接買い付けを始めてから、この【シングルオリジン】は毎年進化をし続けています。2008年に入社をしてから、様々なコーヒーを扱ってきました。その中でも【シングルオリジン】は様々な進化を続けてきました。ずっと「カングアル村」として、村単位でブレンドの原料として扱われてきたコーヒーが、その中から特に誰のコーヒーが美味しいのかわかり、マリア・アルカディアさんのコーヒーやサロモン・ベニテスさんという偉大な生産者が発見され、その名前で紹介できるようになりました。コスタリカでは、その卓越した栽培・生産処理技術から生産者の違いだけでなく、農園×品種×生産処理により作られる多彩な味わい、無限の味わいの可能性が発見され、【シングルオリジン】の世界をさらに高みへと引き上げてくれました。何年続けていても、発見は尽きることがありません。毎年、興奮させられる新しい何かが発見されています。だから私は、表参道シングルオリジンストアで、私たちがワクワクと興奮してしまうような驚きを、お客様にもコーヒー体験としてお届けしたいのです。お店にお越しいただけたら、1杯のコーヒーを通じて1杯のコーヒーを飲んだ以上の体験をお届けできるよう日々精進し、コーヒーのわくわくどきどきを常に発信できるように目指します。