Yoshinobu Nakayama

Discover Coffee

 

Yoshinobu Nakayama

中山 吉伸

PROFILE

Barista Message Yoshinobu Nakayama

Promotion Support Department / Barista

From Gihu Prefecture

プロモーションサポート部/バリスタ

岐阜県出身

Competition results

  • 2012

    Japan Siphonist Championship: 2nd Place

  • 2013

    Japan Siphonist Championship: Champion

  • 2013

    World Siphonist Championship: 2nd Place

  • 2014

    Japan Siphonist Championship: 2nd Place

  • 2015

    Japan Siphonist Championship: Champion

  • 2015

    World Siphonist Championship: 2nd Place

  • 2018

    Japan Siphonist Championship: Champion

  • 2018

    World Siphonist Championship: 5th Place

主な競技会成績

  • 2012年

    ジャパン サイフォニスト チャンピオンシップ 準優勝

  • 2013年

    ジャパン サイフォニスト チャンピオンシップ 優勝

  • 2013年

    ワールド サイフォニスト チャンピオンシップ 準優勝

  • 2014年

    ジャパン サイフォニスト チャンピオンシップ 準優勝

  • 2015年

    ジャパン サイフォニスト チャンピオンシップ 優勝

  • 2015年

    ワールド サイフォニスト チャンピオンシップ 準優勝

  • 2018年

    ジャパン サイフォニスト チャンピオンシップ 優勝

  • 2018年

    ワールド サイフォニスト チャンピオンシップ 第5位

From Toast and Banana Juice to Coffee

I come from a family of five—my parents, my sister and brother, both of whom are somewhat older, and me. I grew up in Gifu, where there’s a tradition (called morning service in Japanese) of coffee shops serving breakfast at low prices. On weekends, my parents would wake us up and we’d all go to a coffee shop for breakfast. I always ordered toast and banana juice, because that’s what my big brother ordered. I really looked up to him—he was an all-around athlete and he was good at drawing manga and making things by hand. In elementary school I tried to copy him by joining the manga club and working hard at arts and crafts, but I couldn’t do any of those things as well as he could. People started comparing me to him, so I came to dislike trying to emulate my big brother.

I was getting upset more often—upset with myself for not being good at things, and sometimes upset with my sister and brother for treating me like a kid. One weekend, at our usual coffee shop, my dad said to my brother, “Isn’t it time you tried ordering coffee?” And my brother replied, “Nope—it’s bitter.” Then I piped up and said, “I’ll have some.” A little worried, my mom said, “It’s bitter—are you sure?” I brushed aside the question. Toast and coffee were placed in front of me, while my big brother got his usual toast and banana juice. Sure enough, my first real coffee drinking experience left me with one impression—“bitter.” I wondered why on earth people thought it was good. But I hid my real reaction and bluffed, “No problem!” Sounding impressed, my brother said, “I’m surprised you can drink something so bitter.” Coffee gave me a sense of superiority; by drinking coffee, I was able to act like a grownup and show everyone that I could do something my brother couldn’t. At some point when I was in high school, the coffee that I’d been drinking to show off really became an indispensable part of my morning. Having said that, I just made instant coffee—I wasn’t at all particular. You might say the only thing I was particular about was the fact that I drank coffee every morning.

My Family’s Odd Way of Life - The Origin of My Interest in Customer Service?

My dad was a blacksmith by profession and he loved making things—or rather, he was the kind of person who couldn’t sit still. He’d spend all his holidays working on various home improvement projects. One day there was a garden in the bathroom; another day, we found that the bathroom ceiling opened automatically and we could view the night sky. Balconies and little botanical gardens appeared. The house was changing all the time. I suppose I grew up in a slightly odd home. My parents’ current house is the one we moved into when I started high school, but the situation was the same at the house we lived in before that: my dad’s DIY projects were always transforming it. That house had a bar counter and a mirror ball. There were about 100 karaoke records in the living room, and there were quite a few evenings when the room was bustling with guests, almost like a bar. I did feel that my home was a little strange…but even though I was a child, I liked the atmosphere, with all the grownups drinking and having a great time. My mom talked to people over the counter and made drinks like whiskey and water or shochu with hot water, and I’d help take the drinks into the living room. I remember feeling happy when grownups who I brought drinks to would thank me or say, “That’s a super smile!” It might have been those moments of “heart-to-heart communication” that first made me aware of customer service. Well…maybe.

From High School to Career (Attaining My Dream)

Since I was eight, I’d always dreamed of working for a railroad company. My ultimate goal was to be a crew member—a train driver. So I went to a technical high school and specialized in machines and motors. The company that my dad ran was actually a machine manufacturer, so I was used to and enjoyed industrial studies and training, but I never had any intention of taking over my father’s business. I’d always planned to work for a railroad company.

After graduating from high school, I attained my decade-long goal and got a job with a railroad company as a train crew intern. In that moment I really felt that my dream had come true. During the initial training period, however, I underwent the required medical fitness exam and was informed that my result was “unfit.” It seemed to me that my ten-year dream had crumbled as soon as I joined the company. Just after embarking on my career, I was wondering about my future. This indescribable mental state lasted quite a while. Gradually, though, a new resolve emerged. I became more determined to take on the challenges of the life I’d been given. In a 180-degree turn from my industrial studies in high school, I worked for the next 12 years in areas like sales and management, human resources and PR, transferring eight times, relocating nine times, and amassing a variety of experiences. All the work I was involved in during that period was humanities-related. None of the fields were the ones I’d hoped to work in when I was hired, but I have no doubt that these experiences outside my field of interest ended up widening my perspective as a person in the working world.

At the same time, I had qualms about my career, since I hadn’t gained any experience in the areas unique to the railroad company. I wanted more and more to do the kind of work that can only be done at those companies, and the kind of work that only I could do. It’s a matter of course that railroad companies oversee safety and make sure there are no accidents, but it takes enormous effort to achieve a zero accident rate—and even when it’s achieved, the company receives no special thanks from the public. At the time I was in a slightly escapist frame of mind, and I felt that I wanted to do more to make people happy, to contribute my unique strengths to society. The desire to find a place where I could feel at home was getting stronger, and I started to worry about my future.

トーストとバナナジュースからコーヒーへ

家族は5人、両親と少し歳の離れた姉と兄と自分。 生まれ育った岐阜には「モーニング」という文化(習慣)があり、朝早く親に起こされ家族5人で喫茶店に行き朝食をとるのが週末の過ごし方だった。決まって頼むのはトーストとバナナジュース。いつも兄の注文を真似していた。 兄はスポーツ万能、漫画もモノ作りも上手で憧れの存在だった。小学生の頃は、兄の真似をして漫画クラブに入り図工もがんばってみたが、兄のようにはうまくできない。次第に周りから比較されるようになると兄の真似をすることが嫌になっていった。

できない自分と、ときに姉・兄から子供扱いされることに腹を立てることが多くなっていった。ある週末、いつもの喫茶店、父が「もうそろそろコーヒーでも飲んでみないか」と兄に声をかけると「苦いからいらない」と兄は言い返した。それを聞いた自分は「ぼく飲む」と割り込んで答えた。「苦いけどいいの?」と心配そうに声をかけた母親のそれを受け流し、ぼくのところには、トーストとコーヒーが出てきた。兄のところにはいつものトーストとバナナジュース。案の定、はじめてちゃんと飲んだコーヒーの感想は「苦い」の一言。何が美味しいのか。その思いを押し殺して「全然平気!」と強がって言って見せた僕に「よく飲めるな。そんな苦いもの」と兄が声をかけた。兄にできないことが自分にできたような見栄を張った優越感、コーヒーはぼくを「大人ぶらせてくれる」飲み物になった。そんな見栄を張って飲んでいたコーヒーも、高校生になったぼくの朝にはいつしか欠かせないものになっていた。といっても、インスタントコーヒーを淹れるだけでこだわりなど何もなかった。強いて言えば「朝コーヒーを飲んでいる」ということだけがこだわりだったような気がする。

変わった実家暮らし、接客の原点?

鍛冶屋である父はものを作るのが大好きで、というよりじっとしていられない性格で、いつも休日は何かしら日曜大工をしていた。いつしかお風呂の中に庭ができたり、風呂の屋根が自動で開き夜空が眺められるようになったり、ベランダや、小さな庭園ができたりと、家はどんどんと姿を変えていくちょっと変わった実家だ。現在の実家はぼくが高校生になるときに移住したところだが、それ以前に住んでいた家も、父の日曜大工によって姿を変えていったのは同じだった。その家の中には、バーカウンターとミラーボールがあった。カラオケレコードが100枚ほどあるリビングでは、しばしば人が集まるスナックのような賑わいを見せる夜もあった。ちょっと変わった家だなぁといつも感じてはいたものの、そんな家に集まってきた大人たちが、お酒を飲みながら楽しく騒いでいる雰囲気は子供ながら好きだった。カウンター越しにおしゃべりしながらウイスキーの水割りや焼酎のお湯割を作っていた母親、できあがった飲み物をリビングまで運ぶお手伝いをして、届けたときに大人たちから「ありがとう」とか「ニコッとした笑顔がとびきりいいな!」と言ってもらえることがうれしかったのを思い出す。「人と心が通じ合ったような瞬間」、ひょっとしたらこれが「接客」の目覚めだったのかもしれない。なんて。

高校から社会へ(夢を叶える)

8歳の頃から鉄道会社への就職を夢見てきた。目指すは乗務員(運転士)。そのため高校は工業高校へ進学し機械や原動機を専攻した。父が経営していた会社はまさに機械製造を行なっていたため、工業に関する勉強や実習などは慣れ親しんだ好きな分野だったのだが、父の会社を継ぐつもりは一切なく、目指すはずっと鉄道会社だった。

高校を卒業し、10年間憧れ続けてきた鉄道会社に乗務員養成員として採用された。夢が叶ったと実感した瞬間だった。しかし、入社して直ぐの新入社員研修中に行った医学適性検査の結果は「不適格」と通知された。10年間の夢が入社して崩れ去ったような気がした。入社して早々に自分の将来を考えてしまうような何とも言えない心境がしばらく続いた。次第に開き直る気持ちが芽生え、与えられた人生に果敢に挑戦しようという思いが強くなり、工業を先行した学生時代とは真逆に、営業や経営、人事やPRなど、勤続12年間に8回の転勤、9回の引越しといろいろな経験を積むことができた。その間に携わった業務はすべて文系のお仕事。どれも就職したときには望んでいた分野ではなかったが、興味ある分野以外の経験が社会人としての視野を広げてくれるきっかけになったことは間違いない。

と同時に、その鉄道会社でしかできない部門の経験が積めていない自分のキャリアに疑問を感じ、そこでしかできないこと、自分にしかできないことをしたいという気持ちが増していった。安全を司る鉄道会社、事故ゼロは当たり前だが、その事故をゼロにするにはとてつもない努力が必要で、事故ゼロを達成したとしても世間からは別に感謝されるわけでもない。若干現実逃避感のあったこの当時は、もっと人が喜んでくれる、自分だからこそ与えられる価値というものを提供したい。自分の居場所を探すような想いが強くなり、将来を悩む日々を過ごすようになっていった。

A Place Where I Could Feel at Home

While worrying about my future, I also thought about the past, and on my days off I went around looking for old-style coffee shops in Tokyo. What did I order? Toast and banana juice. It gave me a nostalgic feeling, as if I were returning to my starting point. Then one day I ordered toast and coffee. I suddenly remembered that coffee used to be the drink that enabled me to seem grown up. Gazing at the black surface of the coffee, I thought back fondly on those days. I spent an unusually long, peaceful time sipping my coffee, and a new thought came to me unbidden: “I’ll make a concrete change.” For the first time in quite a while I was filled with a positive, cheerful feeling. When I was young, coffee had helped me seem grown up, and now it had given me the courage to move forward. At the same time, I was captivated by the pleasant atmosphere of the “coffee shop.” The feeling that I’d like to do this kind of work in the next phase of my life became stronger. I was 29 at the time.

Discovering Maruyama Coffee - “The Coffee of the Future”

Since I loved coffee, it seemed to me that if I wanted to run a coffee shop, the least I should do was learn to make really good coffee. I did an online search for “delicious coffee” and came across a term I hadn’t heard before—“specialty coffee.” Then I did a search for “specialty coffee,” and the site at the top of the list of results was “Maruyama Coffee.” Picturing an individually run coffee shop, I clicked the name and discovered that the store (the current Komoro branch) was actually a lot bigger than that. I was impressed that some of the people there were Japan barista champions, that they used a coffee making method (French press) that was new to me, and that the staff members in the photos seemed to really be enjoying their work.

I’d always had a mental image of the coffee world as a “retro,” old-fashioned world of obsessive, slightly cantankerous artisans. To put it in color terms, the image was dark brown and burnished gold, and suggestive of cigarette smoke. But the Maruyama Coffee website left me with a strong impression of light, clear brown, the unstained brilliance of silver, and the green of nature. I clearly remember the excitement I felt. It seemed to me that this was not the coffee of the past, but the coffee of the future—that something new was about to begin through coffee. Although it was through a computer screen, this was the moment when I first encountered Maruyama Coffee.

Strangely Good Coffee

Since I lived in Tokyo, I looked for a place in the city that served Maruyama Coffee and found a certain cafe. I immediately went there to have my first taste of Maruyama Coffee. Since no other customers were there, I gathered my courage and sat at the counter, right in front of the shop manager. “Maruyama Coffee, please,” I said, and he retorted, “Everything on the menu is Maruyama Coffee.” To my embarrassment, I had thought that Maruyama Coffee was one specific type of coffee; I didn’t know anything about the connection between Maruyama Coffee and the coffees on the menu—Guatemalan, Costa Rican, Brazilian, etc. (so-called single origin coffees). I stared silently at the menu. Finally, the manager said, “To start, why don’t you try the Maruyama Coffee blend?” I obediently ordered the blend.

It was French press coffee. My first impression was that it was murky, so I felt a little perplexed. My first taste of Maruyama Coffee was…“I don’t really understand.” I didn’t dislike it, but the aroma gave me a strange sense of lightness. I’d always judged the flavor of coffee based on how little sourness and intense bitterness—how little unpleasantness—it contained. This was the first coffee I’d ever had that didn’t seem to contain any of those things. I was confused by this first-ever experience of coffee that had none of the unpleasantness I was looking for. “So, how do you like Maruyama Coffee?” asked the manager. I wasn’t able to express my first impression right away, but what I finally came up with was “It’s strangely good.” Of course, that was really disrespectful to the coffee, but it was my candid feeling at the time.

An Unexpected Opportunity

Seeing that I was a total novice, the manager started sharing his extensive knowledge of Maruyama Coffee, baristas, the COE (Cup of Excellence) and more. For a blank slate like me, this was information overload, so I hardly remember anything. All I remember is that he said something totally unexpected: “The president of Maruyama Coffee will probably be happy to show you around the factory if you go for a visit.” I thought, “There’s no way that would happen,” and immediately posted on Twitter what the manager had told me. Twenty minutes later, I got a reply: “Would you like to come?” When I looked closely at the Twitter account, it was Kentaro Maruyama, whose photo I’d seen on the Maruyama Coffee website. Simultaneously shocked and happy, I made an appointment for a factory visit then and there, on a public Twitter exchange. This would be my first visit to a directly managed Maruyama Coffee store, as well as a completely unexpected opportunity to meet the head of Maruyama Coffee.

自分の居場所

将来を思い悩む生活の中、昔のことを思い出し、都内にあるレトロな喫茶店を探しては転々とする休日を過ごした。注文するのは「トーストとバナナジュース」。なんだか原点に帰ったような懐かしい気になれた。そんなある日「トーストとコーヒー」を注文してみた。このとき「コーヒーは自分を大人ぶらせてくれた飲み物」であったことをふと思い出し、目の前の黒いコーヒーの液面を眺めて懐かしんだ。いつもより時間をかけて飲んだ静かな時間、自然と「具体的に動いてみよう」という気持ちが湧いてきて、久々に前を向いたような心地よい気分にみたされた。大人ぶらせてくれたコーヒーは、今度は、前に歩み出す勇気を与えてくれた。同時に「喫茶店」という空間の居心地の良さに心奪われ、自分の次なる人生をその仕事にかけてみたいという思が強くなった。29歳のときだった。

丸山珈琲との出会い「これからのコーヒー」

もし自分で喫茶店をやるならば「せめて大好きなコーヒーくらい美味しく淹れられるようにならなければいけない」と思い、ネットで「美味しいコーヒー」と検索してみた。すると「スペシャルティコーヒー」という聞いたことのないワードが出てきた。今度は「スペシャルティコーヒー」を検索したら「丸山珈琲」という名前が検索サイトの一番上に出てきた。個人店主がやっているどこかのコーヒー屋さんだろうと思いながら、それをクリック。個人というスケールを超えた大型の店舗(現在の小諸店)、バリスタ日本チャンピオンというすごい人がいる、見慣れないコーヒーの淹れ方(フレンチプレス)、そして楽しそうに仕事をしている雰囲気のスタッフの写真が目に飛び込んできた。

コーヒーって、レトロで、古くて、こだわりと個性の強い職人の世界、色で例えるならば焦げ茶色でギラギラとしたゴールドと煙(タバコ)を連想させるイメージだったけれど、丸山珈琲のサイトを見たときは、明るい茶色、何色にも染まらぬシルバーの輝きと緑(自然)の印象が脳裏に強く残った。「これまでのコーヒー」ではなく「これからのコーヒー」とでもいうべきか、これからコーヒーで何が始まるんだろうというワクワクする気持ちが高鳴ったのをはっきりと覚えている。画面の前でのことだけど、丸山珈琲と初めて出会った瞬間だった。

不思議と美味しいコーヒー

当時住んでいた東京都区内で丸山珈琲が飲めるところを探したら、あるカフェがヒットした。早速、初めての丸山珈琲を飲みにその店を訪ねた。店内には客がいなかったので、店主の目の前のカウンター席に勇気を出して座ってみた。「丸山珈琲をください」という注文に対し「メニューに載っているものすべて丸山珈琲だよ」と切り返す店主、恥ずかしいことに丸山珈琲のコーヒーは1種類で、グアテマラだとか、コスタリカだとか、ブラジルなんて書かれたコーヒー(いわばシングルオリジンコーヒー)と丸山珈琲の関係性など何も知らなかった。メニューを見つめ沈黙する自分に「とりあえず丸山珈琲のブレンドを飲んでみたら」という店主の言葉に、言いなりでブレンドコーヒーを注文した。

出てきたコーヒーは、あのフレンチプレス。最初の印象は濁っていたので戸惑う感覚だった。始めての丸山珈琲、飲んだ感想は。。。。「よくわからない」。でもそれは嫌なものではなく、香りも軽やかな不思議な感じ。自分はこれまで、いかにすっぱくないか、苦味がきつくないかといった嫌な部分がどれだけないかでコーヒーの美味しさを測ってきたけれど、その存在を感じない始めてのコーヒーだった。探しているもの(嫌な感じ)がない、そんな始めての感覚に戸惑ったのだ。「どうだ、丸山珈琲の味は?」と店主に聞かれても、始めての感覚を直ぐさま表現できるはずもなかった。ようやく出てきた言葉は「不思議と美味しい」の一言。その言葉って、コーヒー対してとっても失礼な言い方だが、それが当時の自分の素直な感想だ。

思わぬきっかけ

素人まるだしの感想に、店主は丸山珈琲のこと、バリスタのこと、COE(Cup of Excellence)のことなど、どんどんとウンチクを語り出した。無知な自分には情報過多でほとんど覚えていない。唯一覚えているのは「丸山珈琲の社長さんなら、訪ねて行ったら工場の中でも案内してくれるんじゃない」なんていう想像もしなかったような発言。「そんなことある訳がない」と、店主からそう言われたということをTwitter に投稿した。すると20分後「来ますか?」という返事が飛んできた。そのアカウントをよく見れば、丸山珈琲のサイトに写真で出ていた丸山健太郎さん本人だ。驚きながらうれしかった自分は、そのまま公な投稿のやり取りで、工場を見に行くアポイントを取り付けた。これこそが、丸山珈琲直営店を初めて訪問する機会であり、それは丸山代表に会いに行くという思いもしなかったきっかけだった。

His Character Impressed Me Even More than the Delicious Coffee

About two months after that Twitter post, I arrived on the appointed day at the Maruyama Coffee Komoro store. A staff member showed me to a seat, and moments later I was greeted by the person I’d seen in the photo, Kentaro Maruyama himself. He smiled so warmly, it was hard to believe this was our first meeting. I didn’t have confidence in my ability to carry on a conversation about coffee, so I was uncharacteristically quiet. Mr. Maruyama said, “Order any kind of coffee you like,” so I ordered an espresso. When he asked what I thought of the taste, I nervously blurted out, “It’s pretty sour.” Then I thought, “Oh, no, that was rude.” I was worried because I’d had some bad experiences. In the two-month period prior to meeting Mr. Maruyama, I’d visited a lot of cafes—not coffee shops, cafes—and ordered espressos and cappuccinos. Occasionally I’d converse with a barista or manager, and when I mentioned sourness, they’d give me a haughty retort—“That’s because you don’t understand the flavor” or “It’s not polite to use the word sour in a cafe that serves good coffee.” But Mr. Maruyama just laughed and replied sympathetically, “Sour, sour.” Then he said, “But don’t you think the aftertaste is pleasant?” In this easygoing way, he taught me how to savor the taste of coffee. Then he said, “Let’s try it with sugar,” and put sugar in his own coffee. As he sipped it, Mr. Maruyama—who certainly knew more about this coffee than anyone else—exclaimed, “This coffee is incredibly good!” and laughed heartily. Then I put sugar in my coffee. When I tasted it, I was amazed. It actually tasted juicy, as if I were drinking fruit juice. Seeing my reaction, he smiled triumphantly and said, “Hehe—good, right?” Even more than the delicious taste, what remains most vivid in my memory is the hospitality that transformed “strangely good coffee” into “strangely enjoyable coffee.” That’s the thing about Mr. Maruyama. Despite his impressive accomplishments and position, he’s completely unaffected, and he always makes sure the other person feels comfortable. That feeling was new and different from what I’d experienced at other cafes. After the espresso, we enjoyed a cappuccino together.

Looking back now, I think the experience was actually an easy-to-follow introductory course on delicious flavors that I hadn’t known about. I discovered new flavors transcending the borders of the “coffee taste map” I’d drawn for myself while trying various types of coffee. At the same time, being guided through and taught about these flavors enabled me to understand them and revise my own way of thinking for the first time. It seemed the experience of enlarging my taste map had taught me that enjoying flavor is even more important than understanding taste.

As promised, I was taken on a tour of the Komoro factory. I became so absorbed in the conversation that I was surprised to see it was almost time to catch the express bus back to Tokyo. It looked as if I wasn’t going to make it, so Mr. Maruyama drove me to the bus stop, despite the fact that he’d just met me for the first time. Someone who happily goes to that much trouble for others—let’s just say Mr. Maruyama is a strangely good person.

Let Me Be Part of Your Company

After that first meeting with Mr. Maruyama, I would go and see him at Maruyama Coffee in Karuizawa. I also attended several Maruyama Coffee seminars at affiliated cafes in Tokyo that were rented out for that purpose. The more I understood about specialty coffees, baristas, cupping, Maruyama Coffee’s projects and so on, the stronger was my wish to be involved in Maruyama Coffee’s unique business—rather than run my own coffee shop, an aspiration that had been born of a desire to escape reality. A company that carries out a nearly unprecedented kind of venture work; a simple business model that connects growers and customers even though some risk is involved—I wanted to help make Maruyama Coffee a company that continued to gain the public’s acceptance of this ideal business model as a matter of course. When I saw Mr. Maruyama in Karuizawa again one day, I handed him materials outlining my ideas for a business vision that could only be realized by Maruyama Coffee. Finally, I gathered up my courage and said, “Please let me be part of your company.” Six months later, I went to work for Maruyama Coffee. I was assigned to the Komoro store. I was 30 years old.

PR People Are Baristas, Too

After joining Maruyama Coffee, I was assigned to the Komoro store. The entry level period was short, and soon I was assigned to the office division as I’d requested. At first I worked in PR and marketing. In my work, I participated in barista interviews, and after that I had occasion to proofread and check the interview articles. We could appreciate the differences in the flavors and characteristics of the coffees served during interviews when we actually drank the coffee, but I felt that it was really difficult to convey the subtle nuances of these differences in words and photos alone. This experience taught me that, while making delicious coffee is hard, communicating delicious flavor to other people is even harder. I was taught that Maruyama Coffee’s philosophy is “Baristas are messengers.” I was starting to believe that public relations people are messengers who report the merits of coffee, and that public relations work was a type of barista work, even though the communication is one-way.

That’s when I understood what my aim should be—to become a barista who could provide enjoyable experiences to customers. It may seem as if that kind of barista can be found anywhere, but I didn’t think that was the case. There are lots and lots of baristas in the world who can make delicious coffee, and there are baristas who can explain the merits and backgrounds of coffees. But there aren’t so many people who can communicate the appeal of coffee in various ways. And when they can, the communication is usually one-way. It seemed to me that there are hardly any baristas who can offer enjoyable coffee encounters tailored to each customer’s values and experience. To me, “barista” was not an end, but a means. Rather than just making and serving delicious coffee, I wanted to be someone who introduces people to a world of enjoyment that radiates out from delicious flavor. The reason I came to feel this way is that my first position after joining the industry was in public relations—an area in which serving coffee to customers, as baristas do, is not an available option. What was important was not just making coffee, but telling people about it; not only telling, but being understood; and not just being understood, but offering enjoyable experiences. This time, coffee had helped me realize what coffee should bring to the world.

Making Siphon Coffee in a Random Way Resulted in Incredibly Good Coffee

Having said that, I was still lacking in experience in the coffee industry. I couldn’t even make really good coffee, let alone convey its appeal. I felt that I had to engage with and study coffee more. And I thought it was important not just to study, but to aim for a specific goal. That goal was to enter a barista competition. At that time there were many enthusiastic staff members at the store who awaited opportunities to enter barista championships. Since I was coming from a division that was not directly connected, I thought it might be good to try a different type of competition. So I tried making coffee with various coffee makers that I had at home. Quite a while earlier, I’d purchased a siphon coffee maker, although I didn’t really know how to use it or how good siphon coffee is. I got it down from the back of the shelf and made coffee in a random kind of way, and it turned out to be the most delicious cup of coffee I’d ever had. I was thrilled. It was like when you cook something in an improvisational way and it turns out to be incredibly good. The really frustrating thing was that I didn’t have the expertise to recreate that taste. I didn’t know why it was good, how it got that way, or what I had to do to make great coffee again. For that very reason, I thought that if I could control the process myself, I’d be able to offer delicious taste and enjoyment and make people happy with my coffee. With that thought in mind, I became the first person from Maruyama Coffee to enter the Siphonist Championship. It was 2012 and I was 32 years old. Maruyama Coffee took my resolve seriously, and that was the start of the rapid acceleration of my coffee life.

The Siphon and the Door to Life

When I go shopping, the window displays where I can see children’s fingerprints on the glass always strike me as good displays, and I always end up giving them a closer look. It has nothing to do with quality or price; it’s because there’s something about them that triggers an emotional response and draws my interest in a natural way. Of the many coffee extracting devices, the siphon is the one that comes closest to this. As soon as you start making coffee with a siphon, everyone comes to see—young and old, men and women, people of all nationalities. I really love the Japanese word oishii—good, delicious—which contains two Chinese characters, one meaning “beauty” and the other meaning “flavor.” The goodness you taste when you take a sip of coffee is the flavor aspect; but you can say a cup of coffee is oishii in the true sense of the word when the things experienced before and after tasting the coffee are beautiful—appearance and movement, gestures and stories, the hospitality of the person who makes the coffee. As a barista, I don’t want to limit myself to offering coffee with great flavor; my aim is to offer each individual guest an enjoyable and beautifully delicious world through service that conveys a sense of oishii in everything surrounding the coffee drinking experience.

The coffee siphon has a history of about 188 years. Of all the types of coffee makers, it’s one of the oldest and most widely recognized methods. But today there are only a very few people in the world who truly love and understand siphon coffee and serve it in an enjoyable way; that’s the current reality of the siphonist. On the coffee serving side as well as the coffee drinking side, people have yet to discover all the possibilities of the siphon. And that’s what motivates me. It’s only been seven years since I entered a siphon coffee competition for the first time in 2012, but since then the world of siphon coffee has undergone a major transformation among both professionals and customers. This isn’t something in the past tense; the real start is yet to come. In the near future, we’ll finally be able to make people happy by serving them siphon coffee. Through siphon coffee, I’ve become happy myself. There’s happiness in the great taste of the coffee, in my connections with other people, in my meals, even in the purpose of my life. I have the feeling that, through siphon coffee, I’ve found a kind of happiness that no one else can offer. In the past, coffee enabled me to seem grown up. Now coffee has made me a real grownup at last.

コーヒーの美味しさ以上に人柄に感激した

あのTwitter投稿から約2ヶ月、約束の日に丸山珈琲小諸店に着き、スタッフにご案内された客席で待つこと間もなく、写真で見ていたその人「丸山健太郎さん」が、初対面とは思えないほどのニコニコとした表情で現れた。「コーヒー」で会話を広げる自信もなく、こんな自分にしては珍しく沈黙。「お好きなコーヒーどうぞ」という丸山さんの一声に「エスプレッソ」を注文した。出てきたエスプレッソを味わい感想を聞かれてドキドキ「結構すっぱいですね」といってしまった。失礼を言ってしまったと思った。なぜなら、丸山さんに会うまでの2ヶ月間、喫茶店ではなくカフェを何件も巡り、エスプレッソやカプチーノを飲み、時にはバリスタや店主と会話した。そのとき、すっぱいと言ったら「お客様は味がわからないんだね」とか「良いコーヒーを出している店にはすっぱいは失礼」とか、上から切り返されたような苦い経験をしたことがあったからだ。でも丸山さんは「あははは」と笑いながら、「すっぱいすっぱい」と同調したうえで「でも後味が心地よくないですか」と味わい方をさらりと教えてくれた。その上「お砂糖入れてみましょう」と自ら砂糖を入れ味わいながら、誰よりもそのコーヒーのことを知っているはずのご本人が「このコーヒー、めちゃくちゃうまい!」と大笑いしていた。自分も真似して砂糖を入れて飲んだとき、果汁を直接飲んだかのようなジューシーさに思わず驚いた。その様子に「えへへへー、美味しいでしょ」とどや笑顔の丸山さん。美味しさ以上に、「不思議と美味しいコーヒー」を「不思議と楽しいコーヒー」に変換した対応が最も記憶に残っている。そう、すごい方なのに、飾らない人柄と相手に合わせてくれる姿勢、これまでのコーヒー屋さんとは違う新しい感覚だった。そのあと、今度はカプチーノを一緒に味わった。

今思うとその体験は「知らなかった美味しさ」をわかりやすく知る体験だったとも言える。コーヒーについてこれまで自分が飲んで整理してきた味覚マップのようなものの領域を超えたところにある新しい美味しさ。同時に、それがなんなのかをエスコートして教えていただけたことで、理解できると初めて価値観が塗り替えられる。そんな味覚マップを広げる体験は、味がわかるようになるということより、味わいを楽しめるようになることの方が大事であるということを教わったような気がした。

約束どおり小諸工場内を見学してもなお話に夢中になり、いつしか東京へ帰る高速バスの時間が迫り迫った。間に合いそうにない初対面の自分を、丸山さんは車でバス乗り場まで送ってくれた。そこまでしてくる丸山さんは、とりあえず不思議といい人だった。

仲間に入れてください

丸山さんと出会って以降、軽井沢の丸山珈琲へ丸山さんを訪ねていった。また都内の卸先カフェを貸し切っての丸山珈琲のセミナーに何度か参加した。スペシャルティコーヒーのこと、バリスタのこと、カッピングや丸山珈琲が取り組んでいることについて理解が深まるほど、自分が喫茶店をやるという現実逃避から生まれた目標よりも、丸山珈琲の特殊なビジネスに携わりたいという思いが強くなった。あまり例のないベンチャーなお仕事、リスクもありながら生産者とお客様を繋ぐシンプルなモデル、そんな理想モデルが当たり前のように世の中に受け入れられ続けるような会社にしたい。ある日丸山さんと軽井沢で再会したとき、自分なりに丸山珈琲にしかできないビジネスビジョンをまとめた資料をお渡しして、最後に勇気を振り絞って「仲間に入れてください」と願い出た。それから半年後、丸山珈琲に転職、配属先はあの小諸店だった。30歳のときだった。

広報担当もバリスタ

丸山珈琲に転職後、小諸店に配属された。しかし下積み期間は短く、希望したオフィス部門に配属され、最初に広報・マーケティングに携わった。仕事上バリスタの取材現場に立ち会い、その後その取材記事の校正確認をする機会がある。取材時に提供するコーヒーの味わいや個性の違い、そんな違いはそのコーヒーを飲んでみれば感じるものの、その違いの微妙なニュアンスを文字と写真だけで読者に伝えるのはとても難しいと感じた。美味しいコーヒーを淹れるのは難しいけれど、それ以上に美味しさを伝えることの方が難しいと感じた経験だった。丸山珈琲では「バリスタはメッセンジャー」という位置付けであることを教わったが、広報担当も、一方通行ではあるがコーヒーの価値を伝えるメッセンジャーであり、広報もバリスタだと信念が芽生えていった。

このとき自分の中に、目指すべき目標が明確になった。それは「コーヒーで楽しませてくれるバリスタになる」ということだ。一見どこにでもいそうに思えることだけど、自分にはそうは思えなかった。すっごく美味しいコーヒーを淹れるバリスタは世の中にたっくさんいる。そのコーヒーの価値や背景を伝えてくれるバリスタもいる。でも、いろいろな形でコーヒーの魅力を伝えてくれる人はそんなにいない。しかしそのほとんどは一方通行であることが多い。楽しむ人それぞれの価値観やステージに合わせてコーヒーを楽しませてくれるバリスタは、ほとんどいないと思った。自分には「バリスタ」はゴールではなく、手段だった。美味しいコーヒーを提供することより、美味しさから広がる楽しい世界をみせてくれる存在になりたい。バリスタのようにコーヒーを飲んでいただくという手段を使えない広報という仕事に、業界に入って最初に携われたのがそう思わせてくれた。淹れることより伝えること、伝えることより伝わること、伝わることより楽しみを提案できること。コーヒーは、今度はぼくに「コーヒーがもたらすべきもの」を感じさせてくれた。

適当に淹れたサイフォンが最高に美味しい

そうは言っても、業界経験の浅い自分は、伝える以前に美味しいコーヒーがそもそも淹れられない。コーヒーそのものともっと向き合い勉強しなければいけないと感じていた。しかも、ただ勉強するのではなく、具体的な目標に向かうことが大切だと思った。それがバリスタ競技会への出場だった。当時店舗にはバリスタチャンピオンシップに出場できる機会を待つやる気のあるスタッフがたくさんいたため、間接部門だった自分はあえて違うジャンルに挑戦したらどうかと思った。だから、自宅にあったいろんなコーヒー器具で、コーヒーを淹れてみた。かなり前に購入した、淹れ方もその美味しさもよくわからなかったサイフォンを棚の奥から引っ張り出し、適当に淹れてみた。それが人生最高にコーヒーの美味しさに感激した一杯になった。適当に作った料理がとてつもなく美味しかったときと同じだ。しかし悔しかったのは、なぜ美味しいのか、なぜそうなるのか、どうしたら美味しく淹れられるのか、再現できるノウハウがないのが現実だった。だからこそ、それが自分の手でコントロールできるようになったら、自分のコーヒーを通じて、多くの人を美味しさと楽しさで幸せにできるのではないか。そう思って丸山珈琲から初めてジャパンサイフォニストチャンピオンシップに出場した。2012年、32歳のときだった。その志を真正面から受け入れてくれた丸山珈琲、ここから自分のコーヒー人生は加速し始めた。

サイフォンと人生の扉

買い物にでかけたとき、ショーウィンドウに子供の指紋が付いているディスプレーは良いディスプレーだと思い、思わずそれをチェックしてしまう。品質がいいとか値段が高いとかではなく、素直に興味を惹かれるような、心を動かすきっかけがそこにはあると思うからだ。数あるコーヒーの抽出道具の中でも、特にサイフォンはそれに似た要素を兼ね備えている。淹れているだけで老若男女、国籍も問わず多くの方が寄ってくる。「美味しい」という日本語は実に大好きだ。飲んだときの味わいのおいしさはまさに「味」の部分の話だが、見た目や動き、所作やストーリー、淹れてくれた人のおもてなしなど、味わう前後において体験することが「美しい」とき、その一杯は本当の意味で「美味しい」といえる。バリスタとして「味わいがおいしい」一杯を提供することだけに囚われず、前後のすべてにおいて「美味しい」と感じるサービスによって、楽しむ人それぞれに「美味しさが広がる楽しい世界」を提供できる自分を目指したい。

サイフォンには約188年の歴史がある。数ある器具の中でも歴史はながく、同時にその存在もよく知られた方法だ。しかし、そんなサイフォンを心底愛し、深く理解して楽しく提供している人は、世界中圧倒的に少ないのもサイフォニストの現状だ。提供者も提供される側の人も、まだまだサイフォンの可能性を知らないし。だからこそやりがいがある。2012年、最初にサイフォンの競技会に出場してからまだたった7年だが、その間にもサイフォンがもたらす世界は、プロの間でもお客様の間でも大きく変わってきた。それは過去形ではなく、これから本当のスタートがやってくる。これからがようやく、サイフォンコーヒーで人を喜ばせることができる。サイフォンコーヒーで自分は幸せになれた。コーヒーの美味しさも、人間関係も、食生活も、人生の生きがいも。自分にしか提供できない幸せをサイフォンによって見つけられたような気がする。自分を大人ぶらせてくれたコーヒーは、ようやく自分を大人にしてくれた。

Message to customers

お客様へのメッセージ

I’ve been in this business a relatively short time, but in that time I’ve encountered many types of coffee produced by many different growers. Superb coffee isn’t about whether it’s good, it’s about how it’s good—about enjoying the differences in the characters of different coffees. A coffee is the creation of a grower; and I think of the Omotesando store, which has many of these creations on its shelves, as a sort of museum. Look, drink, savor—through its story and the way it’s displayed in a home, a work meets a visitor, and its unique value thus becomes complete. In offering people these encounters and delights, we baristas are just like museum guides. Coffee is something that customers should experience and enjoy in their own way, without any constraints. So please feel free to talk to us and ask questions. Coffee is communication. I plan to continue welcoming customers with pride in my work, in order to offer each of them a delicious cup of coffee and an experience they can enjoy in their own unique way.

まだまだ経験の浅い自分ですが、そんなわずかな期間にも、たくさんの生産者のたくさんの種類のコーヒーと出会うことができました。美味しいかどうかではなく、どう美味しいのか個性の違いを楽しめるのが素晴らしいコーヒー。コーヒーは生産者の作品であり、そんな作品の揃う表参道店は、美術館のように思っています。見て、飲んで、味わいで、ストーリーで、自宅での飾り方によって、作品はお客様と出会ってはじめて唯一無二の価値が完成します。そんな出会いと楽しみを提案する我々バリスタは、美術館の案内人と同じ。コーヒーは肩肘張らずお客様が自由に感じて楽しむべきもの。だから遠慮なく、私たちに声をかけていただけたらうれしいです。コーヒーはコミュニケーション、美味しい一杯と、お客様にあった楽しみの提案ができるよう、これからもこの仕事に誇りをもってお迎えしたいと思います。